The Earliest Signs of Pregnancy

The Earliest Signs of Pregnancy

Are your breasts swollen and tender? Do you feel nauseated when you wake up in the morning? Could you be pregnant? 

Of course, the only way to know for sure is through pregnancy testing. However, knowing some of the earliest signs of pregnancy may help you determine whether you should schedule a test or not.

At Eve Medical of Miami, we offer free pregnancy testing, including tests that provide accurate results before you miss your next period. 

Here, we want to share some of the earliest signs of pregnancy so you know when to schedule your pregnancy test.

The process of conception

With so many unexpected pregnancies, you may find it hard to believe that the process of conception is quite complex. In order to get pregnant, many things must be in alignment.

About two weeks after your period, your ovaries release one mature egg into your fallopian tube. This is known as ovulation. 

Your mature egg then spends about 24 hours in the fallopian tube waiting to be fertilized by one single sperm. When not fertilized, your mature egg moves to the uterus and dissolves.

If your mature egg gets fertilized, the cells divide and multiply, causing the fertilized egg to grow. It then slowly moves through the fallopian tube towards the uterus for implantation. 

Earliest signs of pregnancy

Unlike the unfertilized egg, it takes the fertilized egg about 3-4 days to move through the fallopian tube before reaching the uterus. 

Cramping and spotting may be one of the earliest symptoms of pregnancy, which occurs when your fertilized egg implants itself into your uterus. Known as implantation bleeding, this symptom may occur within 12 days after fertilization of your egg. 

At the moment of implantation, your hormonal levels change and your body increases production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), also known as the pregnancy hormone. These hormonal changes may also cause early signs of pregnancy, such as:

 A late period is also considered an early sign of pregnancy.

However, these symptoms may also be a normal part of your menstrual cycle, even your late period.

About pregnancy testing

If you suspect you may be pregnant, with or without early signs and symptoms, the only way to know for sure is through a pregnancy test. There are two types of pregnancy tests, urine tests and blood tests. Both types look for elevated hCG levels. 

Urine pregnancy test

At-home pregnancy tests are urine pregnancy tests. We also offer urine pregnancy tests at the office. 

Most of these tests can detect hCG in your urine as soon as 10 days after conception. However, you’re more likely to get a false negative from a urine pregnancy test if you take it before you miss your period. 

Blood pregnancy test

You need to see your doctor or go to a clinic for a blood pregnancy test. We also offer this type of pregnancy testing.

The blood pregnancy test is more sensitive than the urine test, and you can get accurate results within 12 days of conception. 

The earliest signs of pregnancy may be tough to differentiate from the normal symptoms you experience during your menstrual cycle. If you think you might be pregnant, call our office in Miami, Florida, or request an appointment online to schedule your free pregnancy test. 

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